Difference Between Office 2013 Suites and Office 365

2013mohbI get this question about the difference between the Office 2013 suites and Office 365 more than any other question. The main two differences have to do with “the cloud” and your ownership.

Microsoft Office is still the name Microsoft uses for its familiar productivity software. Office suites have traditionally included applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. All Office 2013 suites include the latest versions of the applications, for use on a single PC.

Microsoft uses the name “Office 365” for products that include cloud services, such as additional SkyDrive online storage, Skype minutes for home use, Lync web conferencing or Exchange Online hosted email for businesses. Cloud services are features that are enabled over the Internet.

Some Office 365 plans also include the full-featured Office 2013 applications, which users can install across multiple computers and devices. Some Office 365 plans do not include the full-featured Office 2013 applications. Consequently, one gets stuck with limited "cloud" versions of familiar Office applications like Word and Excel.

All Office 365 products, such as Office 365 Home Premium, are paid for on a subscription basis, annually. Active subscribers will receive future rights to version upgrades as a benefit of their subscription. One pays for Office 365 every year.

Office 2013 suites require a one time payment. After payment, one owns the license to an Office 2013 product in perpetuity; in other words, forever.

I still use Office 2002, a product I paid under a hundred dollars to acquire, on some of the computers I own. But my standard, Office 2007 that I purchased one time in 2008, gets all my work done without any issues.

So, pay one time and own forever a Microsoft Office suite, preferably on DVD; or pay forever for Microsoft Office 365 adding a bit of cloud stuff, most of which one can get free already.

Move To A New QuickBooks Server

contactI recently responded to a request about using a Mac as a server. It got me to thinking about two things; how much I like Macs and how I move client’s QuickBooks to a new QuickBooks server after a hardware upgrade. I hope this information helps you out.

My response:

I also like Macs except when it comes to QuickBooks. You may have picked up on the fact that I always install a full version of QuickBooks on the server; never using Intuit’s “server install only” option for QuickBooks. Consequently, Mac is not an option for me. Intuit allows for a free extra server install in their licensing. I developed my XP Pro server installation as a reasonably inexpensive alternative to hosted QuickBooks, Windows Server operating systems/hardware installs and Apple or Linux installs.

For several years now, I’ve used my own methodology to move QuickBooks from a desktop or old server to a new server. I always use unique folders for each unique group of companies. I evaluate and enumerate the existing company files folder to see what I’m working with. Every company has their own unique mess. Once I’ve figured out the mess, I plan the cut-over date and build the new server including the new folder structure. Just prior to cut-over, I complete a fully verified backup of each company file. I will generally rebuild the company files when they do not verify. On many occasions, especially with large files, the company accountant will need to back out transactions or clean up the data before the file will verify.

Upon cut-over to the new server, I perform a restore from the verified QuickBooks backup file, moving unique companies into their respective new folders. Then, I go back to pick up custom reports, invoices, images, etc in their folders, like “QuickBooks Letter Templates”, “[company file name] – Images”, “Templates” as well as other folders with names relative to past versions. I will also pick up any shipping databases or other third party add on files. Finally, I copy the entire contents of the old company files folder to a unshared location on the server from where I can get anything that might be found missing several days after the cut-over.

Folks have a habit of placing task lists, spreadsheets, pdf docs and other extraneous files in the company files folder. I will copy those over to a shared “Accounting” folder and train users to place any accounting related support documents in that folder. In spite of that, I still see stuff land in the QuickBooks company file folders when I’ve returned weeks or months later.

On a side note, I’ve stopped using “Q” as a mapped drive letter. Microsoft reserved “Q” for their click to run software. Seems that everyone gets Microsoft Office from click to run these days. Consequently, I go to each client computer and map the server shared QuickBooks company files folder to a new drive letter.

Systems Lessons To Learn From Core Strength for Cyclists

I like to bike and have biked for years. Anyone that bikes seriously will tell you how important one’s core strength is for performance and endurance. I’ve not seen a better group of core strength exercises than these from Tom Danielson and Allison Westfahl from their book, Tom Danielson’s Core Advantage: Core Strength for Cycling’s Winning Edge.

So, I decided to create this page to use as a visual workout guide. Since one video is worth thousands of words, check out the example from youtube.

You can grab a copy of Tom and Allison’s great book from Amazon.

What does core strength have to do with computer and network systems, you ask? If you want your systems to endure over time and perform at a top level, develop strength in your core systems management practices. Use high quality systems monitoring, state of the art mobility management and best practices driven systems management. One can accomplish all of that, even with disparate systems located in your office and in the cloud. If you’re wondering how, contact me.

Posted in Business Systems Support Cycling by Les Murphy. No Comments

Utilize Systems Monitoring To Meet HIPAA Requirements

nurse computerAll systems monitoring should be configured to facilitate HIPPA compliance. However, the first step dictates that one deploys systems monitoring to all devices resident on the health care providers’ network. This often forgotten area of technology management needs illuminating to help bring some order and methodology to deploying activities that keep your medical enterprise fully HIPAA compliant.

HIPAA Security Rules specifically outline US national security standards to protect health data created, received, maintained or transmitted electronically, also known as electronic protected health information (ePHI). The HIPAA Security Rules are divided into 3 distinct categories and below is a summary of each.

  • Administrative Safeguards. This section of the HIPAA security requirements is focused upon establishing a risk analysis process, with periodic reviews, assigning security management responsibilities, formulating security policies and procedures and establishing appropriate workforce security training.
  • Physical Safeguards. This section of the HIPAA security requirements is focused upon securely controlling physical access: to data processing facilities, workstations and devices as well as physical media which contains PHI (personal health information).
  • Technical Safeguards. This section of the HIPAA security requirements is focused upon establishing specific technical security controls which aim to protect PHI via the following key aspects: data access control, data & access auditing, integrity and transmission security.

Below is a detailed description of each HIPAA related configuration item and the required guidance towards a HIPAA compliant configuration. As per the HIPAA requirements, for items listed as Addressable the entity must perform one of the 3 options: 1) Implement the required control as stated 2) Implement an alternative control which meets the intent of the original control 3) If implementing either, they must document the technical and or business constraint which prevents them from doing so. For items listed as “Required” the entity is required to implement this control as stated.

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(C) – Terminating Access

Addressable

Have you implemented procedures for terminating access to EPHI when an employee leaves your organization or as required by paragraph (a)(3)(ii)(B) of this section?

» Recommendation: Utilize the systems monitoring dashboard to remotely remove terminated employees from all in-scope EPHI related systems.

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(A) – Security Reminders

Addressable

Do you provide periodic information security reminders?

» Recommendation: Utilize systems monitoring to push periodic reminders to the in-scope workstations.

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(B) – Malicious Software

Addressable

Do you have policies and procedures for guarding against, detecting, and reporting malicious software?

» Recommendation: systems monitoring provides managed antivirus services that guard, detect and report against malicious software.

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(C) – Monitoring Login’s

Addressable

Do you have procedures for monitoring login attempts and reporting discrepancies?

» Recommendation: Utilizing the systems monitoring dashboard, develop procedures to periodically review audit logs and login attempts.

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D) – Password Management

Addressable

Do you have procedures for creating, changing, and safeguarding passwords?

» Recommendation: Via the centralized management capabilities of the systems monitoring dashboard, develop procedures to create, change and safeguard passwords.

164.312(a)(2)(i) – User Identity

Required

Have you assigned a unique name and/or number for identifying and tracking user identity?

» Recommendation: systems monitoring requires each user ID to be unique and tracks activity according to such. Further, ensure there are no shared user accounts within the client environments you manage.

164.312(a)(2)(iii) – Inactive Sessions

Addressable

Have you implemented procedures that terminate an electronic session after a predetermined time of inactivity?

» Recommendation: systems monitoring automatically times out inactive user sessions.

164.312(a)(2)(iv) – Encrypting EPHI Data

Addressable

Have you implemented a mechanism to encrypt and decrypt EPHI?

» Recommendation: systems monitoring mail automatically and transparently encrypts all mail archives with secure AES 256bit encryption, thereby protecting any EPHI information potentially contained within the archive.

164.312(b)(2) – Audit Reporting

Required

Have you implemented Audit Controls, hardware, software, and/or procedural mechanisms that record and examine activity in information systems that contain or use EPHI?

» Recommendation: User audit reports are dynamically generated by default and can be accessed at any time via the systems monitoring dashboard. Develop procedures to periodically review and investigate any discrepancies.

164.312(d) – Authentication to EPHI Data

Required

Have you implemented Person or Entity Authentication procedures to verify that a person or entity seeking access EPHI is the one claimed?

» Recommendation: Consult with your client and determine the appropriate level of security. Upon such, implement strong password authentication & for further security, configure the systems monitoring dashboard to validate source IP addresses.

164.312(e)(2)(ii) – Encrypt EPHI Data in Transit

Addressable

Have you implemented a mechanism to encrypt EPHI whenever deemed appropriate?

» Recommendation: Configure systems monitoring mail to only transmit email traffic via IMAPS (IMAP over SSL) as this will securely encrypt and protect EPHI transmitted via email over the Internet.

Dropbox Tops Inc’s List of Top 10 Apps Banned in the Office

imaInc Magazine recently included Dropbox in their list of top 10 apps banned in the office. That’s because, while it’s a valuable productivity tool, users aren’t usually aware of the security and control risks that it introduces.

If you’re having Dropbox issues, consider SecuriSync. It offers file sync and share that both employees and administrators will love. That’s because it’s built to meet both their needs, with easy file syncing and sharing that’s balanced by full admin control and direct integration. Contact me to learn more about SecuriSync, Exchange Mail and Hosted Telephone Systems.

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